The Power of Community: Addressing the Pierce County Behavioral Health Crisis

For 12 years, Amy Riggio and her family struggled without the proper resources in Pierce County to diagnose and treat her serious behavioral health illness. Today, she is a happy, healthy, high-functioning, kind and loving person — real person living with a behavioral health condition, just like one in five Americans. Our community desperately needs more resources to help people like Amy, which is why MultiCare and CHI Franciscan have joined forces to build a new behavioral health hospital in Tacoma. You can help too. Learn more at waystohelp.multicare.org

Anonymous
about 2 years agoSeptember 26, 2017
Thank you, Amy.
Amy Riggio
about 2 years agoSeptember 28, 2017
You are most welcome. Thank you for taking the time to watch it! <3
Br. Paul Cawthorne, S.J.
about 2 years agoOctober 5, 2017
00:00:00
Amy, I never knew or suspected your problems. I'm so happy you've gotten help and that it has been successful.  Give my best to your parents and sarah and Mark.
Br. Paul, S.J.
Marie McDonald
about 2 years agoSeptember 27, 2017
09:51:18
You rock, Amy! Thank you, for doing this.
Love ya,
Marie
Amy Riggio
about 2 years agoSeptember 28, 2017
Thank you, Marie! <3 you back!! :)
Kit
about 2 years agoSeptember 27, 2017
09:51:20
What love and courage this family is sharing with all of us!! I am moved to be part of the community solution - and when I find out how that plays out I will be thinking of Amy, and the example she has become for all of us.  Please share this video as widely as possible and put a donate now button right next to it.  The power of this is not done!!
Amy Riggio
about 2 years agoSeptember 28, 2017
What kind and encouraging words, Kit. Thank you. I am so honored to be in any way a part of making this hospital come together. People's generosity just blows my mind.
Lin
about 2 years agoSeptember 28, 2017
Awesome Amy, you are making such a positive difference.  Your courage and openness is so admirable.  Thank you for sharing.  <3
Peggy McEntee
about 2 years agoSeptember 29, 2017
Deeply touched by the sharing of your journey. By being so willing to speak your truth - you are an agent of change. The dialogue you have opened up too is so long overdue in our community. I'm grateful that ChiFranciscan and MultiCare are collaborating to open up facility with trained staff to support those in crisis.  Hoping it will also be a place where those in our community can get help before being in crisis.  All the best to you in your masters program.   Blessings to you and your mom & dad. So, so grateful for you all.
Dani Hart
about 2 years agoSeptember 29, 2017
Thank you so much, Amy.  You're ALL amazing!!  And yes, it's about community!  I hope this film will raise awareness.  Your courage to tell your story is such a gift.  I wish you every blessing as you go toward your dreams.
Anonymous
about 2 years agoSeptember 30, 2017
Oh, Amy, your courage is empowering! Thank you for sharing your story and blessings to you as you strive for your dreams!
Donna Knudson
about 2 years agoOctober 1, 2017
Amy, I'm so proud of you. You are a brave, tenacious and,yes, a resilient woman
Anonymous
about 2 years agoOctober 5, 2017
Thank you, friends. I am so honored to have been a part of this. It was hard to decide to be upfront and not anonymous. But I consulted with my family and they all got behind me and behind this cause. I am considerably blessed. Love to you. - Amy
Anonymous
about 2 years agoOctober 6, 2017
So proud of you! This is such an amazing, inspriring video! Thank you for sharing your story.
Nancy Granger, Pariish Mental Health Nurse
about 2 years agoOctober 10, 2017
Thank you so much, Amy, for giving others inspiration and courage!
Sherry Schultz
about 2 years agoOctober 24, 2017
Thank you, Amy, for telling your story.  You are a warrior, blessing many people with your courage and hope.
Ginny Miller Cox
over 1 year agoApril 3, 2018
Oh Amy, I was just given the info about your video by Patty Garcia, and I was moved to tears. What courage it must have taken to reveal your inner struggles! I am so pleased that you have finally found the path to healing. My heart breaks for what you and your family have endured, but know that there is much love & faith propelling everyone. I will keep you in my daily prayers, and wish you all things peaceful and beautiful. Sending love.
Anonymous
over 1 year agoAugust 9, 2018
Hey Ginny! Nice to hear from you; it’s been ages but you have a special place in my heart.
Anonymous
over 1 year agoAugust 9, 2018
Comment to Ginny is from Amy, in case that wasn’t clear. Hitting “enter” to start a new paragraph ended up posting it! Anyway, all of you, I appreciate your support and kind words. Sharing this was one of life’s most major and important events for me. The idea that it could help anyone honors me
Anonymous
over 1 year agoAugust 11, 2018
Even in communities, large cities where there is an abundance of mental health care, getting the diagnosis of bipolar can take way too long. In part due to its complexity, but also because most psychiatrist offices are just like a revolving door. You walk in and spend 15 minutes with someone, they ask how you reacted to a medicine, and then they try a new one. I spent a year trying at least a dozen psychiatric medications, reacting them in ways that we're clear indicators of bipolar. Mania, psychosis, the list goes on. Eventually I became very suicidal, and was still told to keep trying new medications. Then I was labeled by a doctor as being medication sensitive, and told that I might be too complex for him or anyone in psychiatry. Where do you go from there? You feel completely hopeless. When I started with a new psychiatrist, and she looked at the big picture, she immediately told me that I was bipolar. Things didn't improve immediately from there. I then had to begin trials of mood stabilizers, most of which made me dumb and tired. The bottom line is, I finally got enrolled in an IOP program in a hospital and was assigned to a very good psychiatrist. There were still weeks of trial-and-error are there, but then finally I went into full-blown Mania, and there was no more confusion about whether I was suffering from major depressive disorder or bipolar. Finally, I knew I have bipolar disorder. It was such a relief. Now I'm finally beginning to find medications that help me, but I'm still not stabilized. I don't think people understand what bipolar is really like. It completely changes you. When I am hypomanic or manic, I'm not myself at all. It's like I'm on a mind-altering substance. It's near impossible to use good judgement when in that frame of mind. At this point, I know that I'm finally getting to stabilization. I'm not there yet, but I finally have hope. Thank you so much for sharing your experience. I hope that it spreads awareness and understanding.
Anonymous
about 1 year agoSeptember 26, 2018
Hello to the last commenter, this is Amy. I’m finally seeing this comment because Facebook just told me today is the one year anniversary of this video being posted.
Anonymous
about 1 year agoSeptember 26, 2018
Hello to the last commenter, this is Amy. I’m finally seeing this comment because Facebook just told me today is the one year anniversary of this video being posted.
Anonymous
about 1 year agoSeptember 26, 2018
Oops, apparently “return” posts the comment immediately. Anyway, this is Amy, and I just want to tell the prior commenter - the one who FINALLY has gotten the proper diagnosis and is FINALLY in the hands of a good psychiatrist... you inspire me. I’m
Anonymous
about 1 year agoSeptember 26, 2018
(Continued from last comment)I’m inspired by you. I don’t know you, but I am proud of you. You’ve hung on and stayed determined to be well. I hope you see how amazing you are. I also pray you find the balance that works for you and are able to move on to a life where you can truly find yourself, and tap into the strengths that having unchecked mental illness can keep you from. Also, wanted to share some language one of my grad school professors gave me. I no longer say, “I’m bipolar.” I say, “I have bipolar disorder.” Because bipolar isn’t my identity. That was a fascinating thing to have pointed out to me. Anyway, however you choose, I hope you go on to a life that is a lot happier due to having balance, finally, like mine has. Thank you for sharing. Take care. ~ Amy
Your comment